SnoPasses

MANITOBA PUBLIC INSURANCE Agents

Purchase your SnoPass at any Manitoba Public Insurance Agents throughout Manitoba - MPI Broker Locator

Please visit the MPI website for more information regarding Snopasses.

Out-of-Province Snowmobilers

If you are not a Manitoba resident you must purchase a Snopass to ride the trails in Manitoba.You can purchase either an Annual Snopass or a Seven-Day Snopass. You must show proof of ownership and a valid registration from another jurisdiction that includes a minimum of $200,000 third-party liability coverage. An Annual Snopass allows you to ride on designated trails until April 30.

Did you know that Saskatchewan snowmobiliers are welcome to enjoy Snoman's trail system? In the Crown Lands Act, the requirement for a permit does not apply as long as the person's snowmobile is displaying a current Saskatchewan Government Insurance registration sticker on its license plate.

Manitobans are also welcome to enjoy Saskatchewans trail system! In the Snowmobile Act, all Saskatchewan and out-of-province registered sleds can ride on all Saskatchewan designated trails with a current valid registration from home province or state.


To purchase your Snopass in advance, you can mail your information to an MPI Broker. Your Snopass sticker will be mailed to you from the Broker. Please allow time for this process. For locations and addresses of MPI Brokers in Manitoba, please click here.

Are Snopasses mandatory?

If you wish to travel on designated Snoman trails in Manitoba, you must by law have a valid Snopass and display a Snopass sticker on the valid Off-Road Vehicle plate on your snowmobile. Natural Resource Officers and the RCMP patrol the trails regularly. A snowmobiler found to be on a designated trail without a valid Snopass will be fined over $470.00.

What's the purpose of the Snopass?

Your Snopass fee helps to enhance recreational snowmobiling across Manitoba, as it supports the local Snoman member clubs who groom and maintain more than 12,000 kilometers of designated trails across Manitoba.

What other benefits does a Snopass offer?

  • Entitles the Snopass purchaser to ride all of Snoman's designated snowmobile trails.
  • Manitoba Snopasses also provide additional entitlement to ride on designated trails in Saskatchewan.
  • Creates more sustainable funding to ensure the designated trail system continues to provide snowmobilers with a safer riding opportunity.
  • Provides important announcements on safety and trail conditions through media such as radio, print, and website.
  • When you purchase a Snopass, you receive a Snoman official trail map for the season.
  • Four issues of SnoRiders West, Snoman's official regional publication (one per household).

Manitoba public insurance Snowmobile brochure

Brochures available here

What is Snoman?

Snoman (Snowmobilers of Manitoba) Inc. is a non-profit organization representing 52 member snowmobiling clubs that maintain and groom over 12,000 kilometres of Manitoba's scenic trails. Member clubs are financially supported through the sale of Snopasses.

How much does a Snopass cost?

An Annual Snopass costs $150.00. A 7-Day Snopass costs $75.50. If you ride 500 kms per season on designated trails, the annual snopass of $150.00 breaks down to paying 0.30 cents per km travelled. The more you ride the better your value becomes. Fuel and oil savings is another cost benefit of riding groomed trails.

Voucher Option: A new option now available is a Snoman Trail Voucher - which could be a perfect Christmas gift for snowmobilers. Manitobans will now be able to purchase this voucher which has a value of $150.00. The voucher can only be used by a registered snowmobile owner to purchase a Snopass. The voucher can be redeemed at any Manitoba Public Insurance location, or any Autopac agent location in the province.

Snopass Prices

All the prices include GST
Annual Snopass: $150.00
7 Day Snopass: $75.50
Voucher: $150.00 value

Can I get a Refund for my snopass?

We would like all of our snowmobiling friends to know that in seasons where snowmobile clubs are unable to groom their trails due to a lack of snow, Snoman Inc. does not provide refunds to SnoPass holders, nor do we provide a credit for the purchase of a SnoPass for the following year. We ask that you bear with us as we cannot control the weather as much as we would like to!

What happens to the money collected from SnoPass sales in the years where there are reduced amounts of snow?

Snoman operates under an agreement with the Government of Manitoba. This agreement requires that the monies Snoman receives from MPI from the sale of SnoPasses goes directly into a SnoFund Trust Account. Money from the SnoFund Trust Account can be used soley for activities designed for trail maintenance, trail improvements, and administration of the designated provincial trail system in accordance with the agreement.

Who manages the snofund trust?

Under the agreement, the SnoFund Trust is managed by a committee consisting of two members from each of the five regions of Snoman, two members appointed by the Government of Manitoba, and chaired by the President of Snoman.

How do snofund trust funds flow to clubs?

Clubs are compensated per kilometre for the maintenance and grooming of snowmobile trails. The amount of compensation clubs receive is based on total dollars collected from SnoPass sales, the total number of  kilometres of trails in the province, and the total kilometres groomed in the season. The current policy states that clubs are to receive $10.00 per kilometre for trail maintenance and $12.00 per kilometre for grooming but may receive a maximum of $15.00 for grooming (if the funds are available).

what happens if all snofund trust funds are not paid out?

To help ensure that minimum compensation payments can be made to clubs each year, the agreement between Manitoba and Snoman permits Snoman to operate a Stabilization Fund which is to be used when there is a decline in the sales of SnoPasses and/or an increase in grooming activity for a particular year. In a year where after the maximum compensation rates are paid to clubs and there are funds remaining in the SnoFund Trust Account, those funds would be transferred to the Stabilization Fund. Such funds can be used in years of decreased SnoPass sales or increased grooming activity to help ensure minimum compensation payments can be made to clubs.

 

FAQs – Snopass Increase - Effective 2015

Why is the increase needed?

Operating cost for grooming has increased significantly and the rates paid to clubs need to be increased in order to maintain equipment and the trail system.

Based on the increasing needs of Snoman’s member clubs, and based on the current voluntary system, our primary challenge for the future of Snoman is continuing to support the cost of safety and risk management as well as trail infrastructure and volunteer management. 

Our important initiatives in the areas of risk management, protection of the environment, trail planning and auditing, and awareness for public safety regarding snowmobiling requires additional funding at the club level.

When was the last increase in the Snopass fee?

The last increase was over four years ago.

With the lack of snow this year, will there be a lot of cost savings?

Clubs still have trail maintenance which is done earlier in the year.  As well, clubs still get paid for two grooming as per our operational policy.  Clubs still have the costs of loans for groomers, shelter upkeep, and other operational costs.  In the event that all funds are not disbursed to the clubs, the funds go into Operational Stabilization Fund for future use.

What are the new fees?

Snopass - $150/year (GST incl.)
7-day pass - $75.50 (GST incl.)

What is the breakdown of the $150?

Snofund - $133.33
Agent fee - $10.00
GST - $6.67

What would have been the repercussions if the increase wasn’t approved?

Inadequate funding at the club level is detrimental and we have seen first-hand what that results in.  In 2013-14 we had a club fold.  The main reason was insufficient funding for grooming and the lack of volunteers, who have to subsidize the grooming.  The loss of one club created a huge void in the provincial trail system.  Fortunately, this season that club is back in operation, albeit not on the same level as previously. Today clubs need a minimum of $15 per kilometer.  In light of a decreasing volunteer base, clubs need to be able to hire people to do some of the work required.  The potential loss of more clubs will ultimately destroy our trail system.

How do we compare to other provinces?

Even with the increase we are still one of the lowest in Canada.  Current fees range from $132.00 to $360.00.